Author Topic: Pirate Class  (Read 16013 times)

Adam

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Pirate Class
« on: December 15, 2010, 05:02:06 AM »
I'm thumbing through "a Century of Sailing - the First 100 years of the Indian Harbor YC" and there is a statement that around 1930 the Junior program used the Indian Harbor Pirate class designed by Halsey Herreshoff. Now I know Halsey is Good but to design before hes born...well that would be amazing... :P.

They also say they are 18'. Mystic has a photo of some racing mixed in with 12 1/2's and Wee Scotts ans say they are 16'.  Anyway the pics in the book and mystic are not clear but kind of look like small fish class - 12's with a cuddy.  complete with skull and crossbones on the sail...

anyone know who designed these....?

Steve

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2010, 12:24:30 PM »
Biological process being what it is, that indeed would be a feat!

This is copied from Wikipedia:

A Pirate is a type of German sailing dinghy. It was first constructed in 1935, and has no trapeze. The Pirate was designed in 1934 by the German boat builder Carl Martens. The boat was originally manufactured in solid wood, although since the 1960s glass-reinforced plastic, or a sandwich of the two, is also used. According to the regulations for this class of boat, kevlar and carbon fiber are forbidden. Approximately 6,000 boats have been built.[citation needed]

The Pirate is a youth dinghy. It was formerly the only class used in German youth sailing championships. At present, the Pirate class is only registered in Germany. With more than 380 participants in the official rank list, it is one of the most active race classes in Germany. The Pirate is sailed by two persons, and measures 5.0 metres long by 1.6m across.

The Pirate Class has also been used by the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets as a youth trainer.

The maximum sail surface, comprising two sails, amounts to 10 mē according to the class regulations. Since the 1960s, spinnakers up to 10 mē are also permitted. The use of a Genoa or Gennaker is not permitted. The sails can be manufactured from cotton, linen or synthetic fabrics. Carbon fiber in the sails is forbidden, and may be used only as reinforcement in the windows of the sail

HerreshoffHistory

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2010, 07:48:26 PM »
The Indian Harbor Yacht Club's Pirate class consisted of about 10 identical boats for youth sailing. Apparently owned by the club itself, they were first raced in 1927. The last race was apparently held sometime about 1946. Nothing to do with the German Pirat, which is a much more nimble 2-person dinghy. I do not know who designed them.

Adam

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2010, 03:49:39 AM »
I wonder if they were designed by Charles - If I remember correctly he was mainly a NY designer? The one middle right is the Pirate...Note Bullseye farther to the right....rest are Wee Scotts.



« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 03:52:10 AM by Adam »

Adam

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2010, 04:08:21 AM »
Found it:
Pirate one design class sloop (built 1926), design #279 by Cox & Stevens (Pre Phil Rhodes).

HerreshoffHistory

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2010, 09:32:23 AM »
Well done! Good research!

I note however, that the Pirate class was not only designed by Cox & Stevens, but built at Symonette Shipyards.

And these were in Nassau, Bahamas?

I wonder why the Indian Head Yacht Club decided to build its youth boat in Nassau?

Adam

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2010, 10:47:50 PM »
Good question - if you look at the list of builders from the Cox & Stevens collection at mystic, there is hardly a builder the repeats - in fact they seemed to use just about "everyone" who was a builder - maybe they just went with who's ever cheapest at the given time and had no favorites?? Seems the buyer may not of had the choice...

sailboatdata

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Re: Pirate Class
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2016, 12:46:48 AM »
Pirate that is used by the Canadian Cadets is yet another entirely different dinghy which is based on the Flying Junior hull design, or so I have been told.
http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=7379

rb
« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 12:48:26 AM by sailboatdata »