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Herreshoff Forum => Restoration => Topic started by: Erick Singleman on September 08, 2009, 05:10:26 AM

Title: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on September 08, 2009, 05:10:26 AM
I have seen many 12 1/2s of various vintage, but i have yet to see an oar lock socket arrangement where the oar lock is on a separate mahogany block adjacent to the coaming like th eone on my boat.  I am thinking that this is not original.  Anyone seen one like this?

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9d726b3127ccef85b03b29e4300000040O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

Also, I took the bow hardware off tonight and the bow chocks are apparently joined through the stem by a pin.  In my case the pin was steel.  I thought this was odd since it was completely corroded.  Shouldn't this be a bronze pin?

BTW, like the flying buttresses on the coaming?

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on September 08, 2009, 12:16:44 PM
I have not seen an oar lock socket arrangement like this before.  It could have been done by a prior owner? 

What is the 'flying buttress' for?  Maybe a motor mount bracket?  Is there a similar arrangement on the port side?

Your boat would have been fitted with the later-style bow chocks.  Do they look something like this?

(http://www.herreshoffregistry.org/forum/images/12_Chocks_Later.jpg)

After mid-1936, HMCo switched to this style and subbed them out to a contactor rather then cast them in-house.  I would have to crawl through my notes from an MIT visit, but as I recall the casting cards specified bronze.  Many boats from this era had steel hardware, which causes me to speculate that, though bronze may have been written in the casting cards, the actual contract may have not been specific. 

Is it that your chocks are bronze but the pin is steel?  I would probably replace it with a bronze pin.

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on September 08, 2009, 03:12:31 PM
Minx (Ex Target) has them just bolted to the coaming. She is a 1938 (although after the Hurricane HMCo. re-built her - and it was my understanding they used a number of "non-standard" items and construction).

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3167/3029024130_0f3bcd21d5_b.jpg)

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on September 08, 2009, 05:54:35 PM
I have not seen an oar lock socket arrangement like this before.  It could have been done by a prior owner?  

What is the 'flying buttress' for?  Maybe a motor mount bracket?  Is there a similar arrangement on the port side?

I can post more pictures later, but it is apparent that one of the previous owners added the buttress pieces (two starboard and two port), and an extra side brace at the aft end of the coaming, and probably this oar lock block in an effort to strengthen the coaming.

Your boat would have been fitted with the later-style bow chocks.  Do they look something like this?

No, I apparently have the original style bow chocks

(http://www.herreshoffregistry.org/forum/images/12_Chocks_Later.jpg)

After mid-1936, HMCo switched to this style and subbed them out to a contactor rather then cast them in-house.  I would have to crawl through my notes from an MIT visit, but as I recall the casting cards specified bronze.  Many boats from this era had steel hardware, which causes me to speculate that, though bronze may have been written in the casting cards, the actual contract may have not been specific.  

Is it that your chocks are bronze but the pin is steel? YES I would probably replace it with a bronze pin. Yeah, that is the way i am probably going to go.

I also don't understand why the drifts in the transom are steel.  I am planning to use bronze for those as well.


Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 05, 2010, 11:44:11 PM
Hi everyone, here is an update on my latest accomplishments:

I built a steam box back in October, when i was making the station molds.  You may be curious about where I got the shapes for the molds.  It is a combination of shapes obtained for my boat (at bulkhead stations where the shape is held by the plywood), a few tracings the museum let me make, the mystic plans, and another set of plans from a woodenboat forum member who had the Mystic plans computer lofted, and a lot of measurements from my boat. The result is a hull shape that I believe is representative of the original hull and within the variability that exists from boat to boat.

I began beveling the molds for the aft section of the boat in preparation for the steam bending of the frames.  I can only set up half of the molds at a time because i am running out of room in the shop, given I have the boat in there as well.  I also cut out and planed the framing stock and gave the inside edges a roundover.  They were milled from "green" white oak that was cut in August and purchased in September.  They did dry some near the surface to a moisture content of 16-18% so i soaked them for a week, and then primered them.  They are now wrapped up and waitng antother week or so before the first steam bending attempt.

I am currently in the process of shimming up the molds in a few places so that a batten runs fair across the boat from stem to stern. this is very time consuming and tedious.

While doing this, I thought of an interesting dilemma.  According to the book "How to build the Haven", it was the Herreshoff method to bevel the molds so the frames do not have to be beveled. However at stations 6, 7, or 8, or 20 ,21, and 22 where the bevel is significant, the frame will be at an angle to the floor timber where it is to be attached, and therefore not flush.  If you attempt to fasten the frame to the floor timber without inserting a small wedge shaped piece you will either have a loose mechanical joint, or you will force the frame away from its intended angle. Either way not good.  I am thinking of inserting some kind of a wedge unless anyone has any other ideas???

I have added a few more pictures on my shutterfly site at: www.erickswoodenboatpics.shutterfly.com
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 06, 2010, 04:09:58 PM
The boatbuilder/instructor I was working with to restore a BB15 observed that boatbuilding is all about problem-solving.

Here is a photo of one of the 3 sets of original HMCo molds, on a strongback in Aladdin's Cave at Mystic Seaport.  Besides for the bow, where it gets a little tight, it doesn't look like the molds have much of a bevel.

Forum member Bob Perkins is also working on restoring a 12 ... mybe he will chime in.

(http://www.herreshoffregistry.org/forum/images/Molds_12.jpg)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 26, 2010, 04:36:24 PM
Well, I (with a little help for my friends) steam bent about one third of the frames to the new molds this past weekend.  It went surprisingly well.  We were able to get the frames tight to the molds using cable ties and at some points bar clamps.  And we only broke two of twenty frames.  Not bad for a first time.  Good thing we had a carbonmonoxide detector set up though.  Although we had widows open for ventillation, it was apparently not enough, it did go off once after about two hours.

We opened the garage door and let in some fresh air and were good to go.

I have added some pictures and a little blurb on my shutterfly site:   www.erickswoodenboatpics.shutterfly.com
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 26, 2010, 04:59:40 PM
What great pics Erick! For someone like myself who is a real novice at this its a wonderful learning tool. Keep 'em up!

BTW, great shop....I hear a little CO^2 makes you stronger ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 26, 2010, 05:30:02 PM
Nice work, Erick.  The molds look great.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 26, 2010, 07:21:15 PM
Question(s)....If I remember correctly, MIT allows someone to build just one 12 with the plans. So I assume one can not re-sell them, - as well as any offsets, molds, etc. that come from the build...? Is that a correct assumption?

What about if someone is doing a resto (as Erick is) on there own boat. Can someone take offsets and sell them? Can someone sell the molds they made? Assuming of course CCSB doesn’t get wind of it (I am being hypothetical!).  What about if someone else was doing a similare resto - can Erick give them the molds to use?

I would think that those Molds of Erick’s are rather "valuable"....Not that I'm suggesting anything mind you...just curious.... ::)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 26, 2010, 09:34:51 PM
MIT will not sell plans for the 12-1/2.  They do have one line drawing from 1938 but do not have the offsets, etc.  I am not sure they are willing to sell copies of this drawing.

Mystic Seaport will sell you plans they drew from taking the lines off of NETTLE (I believe Maynard Bray did the measuring), but they will only provide the offsets if you can produce a letter from Cape Cod Ship Building authorizing them to do so.  Getting that letter of authorization is no small feat, as CCSB is very protective of their intellectual property.  It has been done, however.

Bill Harding used 3 H12s to take the lines form which Edy & Duff produced the molds for the Doughdish.  I also know that Artisan Boatworks will build you a brand new boat, and they took measurements from several boats as well to draw the lines.

The net of all this is that molds do exist, mostly from the hard labor of individuals taking a seemingly infinite number of measurements.  There are always people looking for such molds, so I am sure there is a market for them.  One must be careful as to the wording used in advertising them, however.  Anyone can build a "faithful reproduction of a Herreshoff 12-1/2".  However, CCSB may send an attorney over to visit with you should you choose to call it an authentic "Herreshoff 12-1/2".

The following is in the Documents section of the Registry:

http://www.herreshoffregistry.org/doc/CCSB_Rights.pdf (http://www.herreshoffregistry.org/doc/CCSB_Rights.pdf)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 27, 2010, 03:57:51 PM
Steve,

I had some email correspondence with Maynard Bray several years ago regarding the accuracy of the Mystic plans.  Although he was working at Mystic Seaport at the time, he did not take the measurements, the fellow who's name is in the drawn by box on the drawing did.  I believe his name was Allyn, I don't have the plans in front of me.  I was at Mystic one time, and was happy to see that Mr Allyn had a dingy named after him.

Regarding the accuracy of the plans, his response was that Mr Allyn was a very capable individual, and he trusted that the work was done correctly.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam Langerman on January 27, 2010, 04:26:15 PM
Not to stir the pot too much, but the technology exists to measure the original model.  That might cut down on the accuracy debate.  Adam Langerman
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 27, 2010, 05:49:04 PM
Adam:  I presume you are talking about the planimeter-like device that HMCo used from the beginning?  No doubt, that would yield the most accurate results.  But I think the issue around what CCSB will take issue with still exists, no ?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 27, 2010, 07:52:29 PM
Not sure I ever posted this - (Abridged version) - (Adam L. may know more...) But several months back Scott Rohrer showed me some very neat technology for taking lines off a hull (I gather from the correspondence never before used).... Seems they are working with the US Parks Service to make the R boat "Pirate" a Federal Landmark status. To do this they needed to file her lines and they didn’t like what they were getting with conventional methods (which he called a "wand" - where a helper spots various points on the hull and those are converted into a plan ), so the head honcho in DC parks department sent over some techies with a new super-accurate system of using remote sensor/transmitters placed around the hull and reconciling scanned readings through a central station.  It literally took billions of 3-D (XYZ) points and was combined to make images.

I gather it was a huge success - and appears a paper is being written about the method. Tax dollars at work - how’s that for a stimulus package....I get the picture there is some guy at NASA scratching his head asking where the heck he put that thing.... ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 27, 2010, 08:04:35 PM
A guy who used to work for me built a system using a PC, 2 servo motors, and a digital camera to take multiple photos of a 3d object at precise points.  His software then calculated offsets using data from the photo files and the amout of distortion caused by different angles (don't ask me), and output an array of points.  He used it to make violins ... sorta like taking the lines off a Stradivarius electronically.  He fed the points into another program that drove a circular saw attached to 3 servo motors to cut a chunk of maple to the exact curves, thicknesses, etc.  The results he turned out were amazing.  He tells me it would be no problem to use it on a boat, or on any 3D object.

That being said, good ol' Nat had a multi-dimensional planimeter that he used to take measurements off of a half-hull.  These were then put into the offset book that the loftsmen used to create the molds.  This low-tech device was pretty accurate ... enough to win a bunch of America's Cups   :).

My guess is this is what Adam L is referring to.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam Langerman on January 27, 2010, 09:19:54 PM
Right,  the offset reading machine is very accurate and still used, with pleasure, on occasion.   We also have a small 3-d scanner we've been playing with recently.   As far as use of the name, this wouldn't solve any problems.  It would put the 'are the lines accurate' question to bed though.   Adam Langerman
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 28, 2010, 12:12:18 AM
Adam - has anyone ever asked to do this? I'd be surprised if it had not.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam Langerman on January 30, 2010, 06:38:39 PM
Not that I'm aware of.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on March 02, 2010, 10:10:24 PM
Hi guys,

Found out something interesting in my struggles so far.  The frames on this boat are supposed to be 13/16" thick, and the planks are supposed to be 1/2" thick.  Now before I tell you what I am going to tell you, let me say that I believe the frames at the bow of this boat, and the planks are original.

I am now at the point where I am beveling these bow molds, and when I compare the way the my boat hollows to how my battens run across my beveled molds, my molds show a lot less or even no hollow were there should be some. I am not that far off, but it's still not right.

So I go back to the boat and make some measurements, and find that the plank thickness is 3/8" and not 1/2" up near the bow, and the frame thickness is closer to 5/8" or 11/16", and not the 13/16" required.  Interesting huh?
As it turns out I think my molds are off by about 1/8 to 1/4" in places, too big, which is better than too small. Fine I can make the necessary adjustments.

Well, I think the shape of my hull in the bow is pretty true so I think I am going to adjust my molds to give me the shape I am seeing here. 

So I will have some interesting questions for the guys at Mystic Seaport next week when I go there to take my private lesson on carvel planking.  One will be... Did they thin the planks in the bow on purpose to get the planks to twist better? Or should they actually be the 1/2" required thickness.  I assume there would be some thinning of the planks when fairing the hull, but not that much. 

I am pretty sure the frames should be the full 13/16 thickness because the 1" screws are just starting to pierce through the inside of the original 5/8" thick frames.

Figuring out these little challenges is what is making this a fun and interesting project.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on March 15, 2010, 03:31:20 PM
I just got back from a private class on spiling and planking at Mystic Seaport.  What an excellent time.  Rick Ramenda is the instructor who is now teaching the classes started by William Garden.  I learned everything I need to know, plus the most important part which is to be very accurate in your marking and wood removal to ensure an excellent plank fit. 

I am now psyched to get through replacing the structural members so that I can start planking, but it probably won't be until the Fall.

The drive home to Albany was a bear.  Flooding near Mystic, and big time snow in the Berkshires.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Jon Brooks on July 05, 2010, 06:27:52 PM
Regarding the "flying buttresses", in the photo of "Minx" (ex-Target, nee Minx) you can see a bronze cam-action cleat mounted to the combing on the Port side.  This was part of the Genoa Jib arrangement added by a previous owner who raced her actively on Long Island Sound against the Cape Cod Bullseye fleet.  But it also stiffened the combings, which had been split longitudinally in the 1938 Hurricane.

The boat also has the earlier (nicer) bow chocks, and as can be seen, the oar-lock brackets are mounted directly to the combings.

Jon   8) 
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 16, 2010, 10:10:35 PM
I've been busy making new frames and floor timbers.  I should be finished installing them all by the end of the month.  four more are ready to go in next week, and then the last two the following week.  Here are some pictures taken last night:

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d937b3127ccefaf543b6719600000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d937b3127ccefaf58ca2b04d00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d937b3127ccefaf5d619b0db00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on July 16, 2010, 10:22:38 PM
Lookin' real good, Erick!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 16, 2010, 10:25:04 PM
Wow - I'd say...Fantastic Erick!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on September 14, 2010, 07:10:47 PM
I finished making the new stem and installed it last night.  I uploaded some pics at my site: www.erickswoodenboatpics.shutterfly.com
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on November 18, 2010, 11:52:00 PM
Going to slow down on the 12 1/2 until spring and the warm weather allows me to drag my table saw out to the driveway to cut my sheer strakes and stuff like that.

I am going to build two Iain Oughtred designed Wee Rob canoes for myself and the wife.  Can work on those two in the house where it's warm. 
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 17, 2011, 07:01:18 PM
We last left our hero rejoicing in the installation of a new laminated white oak stem.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d735b3127ccefb496dbb9ad100000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

Then, there was the insistence by The Admiral to build a canoe, which turned into a pair of canoes, which in turn turned back into a single 14 1/2 foot canoe that will hopefully float the two of us, or else I am swimming behind.

Canoe to date:

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1db32b3127ccefd4fec55e43300000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

So, even though I am not finished with the canoe yet, I am forced by my obsession with all things Herreshoff, to get back to the 12 1/2, splitting time between the boat and canoe.  Good thing the wife is still away six out of every nine days or my time in the shop would be much less than what it is currently.

I have until next January before she comes home full-time, so I better get moving.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on May 18, 2011, 04:23:07 PM
Very pretty Erick! Beautiful work.
You still think the 2012 regatta is doable?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 18, 2011, 04:48:59 PM
At this point I am just hoping to make the 2014 100th anniversary.  However, realistically think I could possibly make the 20113 regatta if things go relatively well.   I would like to make my target dates, but quality of build always wins out over my desire to finish to a schedule.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on May 18, 2011, 05:28:22 PM
That's OK I'll just move the pen mark on the calendar for when I'll be needed for crew...  ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 18, 2011, 05:31:57 PM
I'll give you first dibs, seriously.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on May 19, 2011, 11:46:18 AM
Erick:   Your work looks really nice!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 19, 2011, 02:44:50 PM
Thanks Steve, this canoe is taking longer than expected, but it is such a sweet design that I want to take my time and make it as nice as I can.  But I am very anxious to get back to the 12 1/2.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 21, 2011, 10:03:37 PM
Daughter's wedding, vacation, ...  Boy it's tough to keep moving on a project.  However I did manage to get a little bit done on the canoe despite life getting in the way, and I hope to finish it in about a month.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1d900b3127ccefdff22ffd53b00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1d920b3127ccefdd7dd18851700000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)


But in the meantime, for the 12 1/2,  I acquired some bronze rod for my transom drifts, and picked out the mahogany boards I will use.  Saturday I will bring the white oak board I purchased from that Naval Timbers place in Conn. to my local mill and have it planed to thickness.  So the order of events will be...  1) build transom, 2) Install new transom and new transom knee,  3) Make and install new mahogany sheer strakes, 4) make and install new keel plank.  Then I will be ready to re-plank hopefully next spring and summer.  During the winter I hope to work on spars, tiller, and misc. stuff.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 22, 2011, 02:39:29 PM
Oh how funny a shot of the pool! That is one pretty "canoe"...
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 22, 2011, 02:54:13 PM
Thanks Adam, I am going to paint the sheer strake that Herreshoff light green color like that of Alerion's hull.  I thought that would look nice with the mahogany trim.  She sits a little low with the two of us in it, but I intend to put a taller coaming around the cockpit to keep the splash out.  It weights 40 LBS now, I figure 12 or so more LBS with the deck and trim.

The wife and I have challenged ourselves to lose 15 LBS between us so we can keep the waterline where it is, ha ha.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on December 30, 2011, 05:12:34 PM
At the end of August, I finished up the little Wee Rob canoe, see photo below.  However August was an interesting month in that I also found out I had a cancerous tumor the size of a golf ball in my right kidney.  We splashed the canoe on September 3rd and I was on the operating table on September 7th.  All went as good as can be, as kidney cancer grows very slowly while it is contained in the kidney. The tumor was removed, and there appeared to be no signs of it having spread anywhere else. I was extremely fortunate they found it in time.

So now that I am fully recovered, it's back to the 12 1/2, where I am currently working on the new keel plank.  I have the rabbet made, and will be shaping the bevel from rabbet to the lead.  Then it is on to steam bending that puppy.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1d725b3127ccefe5c56e1a4c700000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1cc11b3127ccefea8726b6d1800000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1cc11b3127ccefea9595f8cdd00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a1cc11b3127ccefea885cc2d5c00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on December 30, 2011, 05:26:52 PM
Looks great, Erick.  When you face a health challenge, it gives you a deeper understanding of life's priorities.  Keep it up!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on December 31, 2011, 04:16:26 AM
Wow Erick....thought you had been MIA for awhile....glad your back - and on the resto.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 03, 2012, 08:40:26 PM
The wife is away for 4 1/2 weeks for military training in Florida so it looks like I will be able to get a lot of time in on the boat.  I finished the keel plank rabbet and made the bevel from the rabbet to the ballast, so that piece is ready for steam bending.  I am currently building a jig to steam it on, and should be ready to steam it this Saturday.  Unfortunately it is starting to get cold up here in Albany, so I will have to spend money to keep the garage warm.  If I were a week ahead of schedule, last weekend would have been a great day for steam bending, it was 52 degrees here.  I use a carbon monoxide detector to keep track of air safety when I use the propane turkey fryer. Every once in a while we'll have to open the garage doors and ventilate.  Pictures to follow.

If my schedule is correct, I will have the keel plank installed, new transom and sheer strakes installed by St. Patrick's Day, and I will be all set for planking when the warmer weather gets here.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 09, 2012, 05:55:29 PM
Steam bending the keel plank.  Bagged the 1 3/8" thick piece in 4 mil poly, and had two stem hoses going in.  It took a long time for the set up to get hot.  It was staying at about 160 degrees for a long time, so I had to start a second boil pot and put an extra hose into the bag to get over 200 degrees.  Kept steam going for about 1.5 to two hours after that, then clamped her down to the form.

We'll see in about a week when I take the clamps off how much spring back there is.  Hopefully not too much.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df28b3127cceff47327a03f800000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df28b3127cceff4605d7639a00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Cardinal Joe on January 12, 2012, 10:18:18 PM
 Erick .....That's Amazing ...... how did you learn those old school ways ? 
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 12, 2012, 10:33:51 PM
I have the book "How to build the Haven 12 1/2 Footer"  It was written by Maynard Bray and Eric Dow, who researched how the original boats were made.  Not sure the poly bags are old school, but it was the  technique Eric outlined in the book to bend the keels on the Haven, only they do it right on the molds.  I have been researching a lot myself, and the folks on WoodenBoat forum have been a great help as well.

It is a little scary doing some of this stuff for the first time, but so far I've been lucky. For example, I don't really know how long to keep this keel clamped up.  When I did the frames, I left them clamped for three or four days, and there was no spring back. My assumption is that they just have to cool, so I probably could release it the next day, but  I am still going to keep it clamped for a week, mostly because I have no free time until then.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 13, 2012, 03:20:20 AM
Erick:  I am thrilled to watch your story unfold!  Though my knowledge is limited to the few classes I have taken, I would agree that letting it sit for a few days is best, if for no other reason then to minimize springback.

A few years ago, Ed McClave, the engineering genius behind the renowned firm of MPG, was selling a software product called Bevel Guage (if memory serves).  Though I believe it is no longer marketed, I found it intriguing because of the mathematical functions the software employed to predict springback.  It is no wonder that their projects, like SPARTAN and AMORITA, are so spectacular!

On the smaller scale of the 12, my guess is that you will be sitting pretty after a few days.  Anyone with more experience... please chime in !

-Steve
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 17, 2012, 08:09:33 PM
I released the keel from the form last night, and noticed some moderate spring back, but since I made the form to a slightly tighter curve, the spring back is not as much as shown in the photos.  I will have to pull down the ends a bit to meet the floors, but it won't be that much.  Overall, I am happy with the result.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df36b3127cceff7609df7ca200000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df36b3127cceff763960fd3500000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 17, 2012, 08:45:05 PM
Very cool Erick. I was just using these pics to show someone in the office how it is done...He was asking how planks get 'bent'...Keep 'em comming.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 24, 2012, 04:25:33 PM
I am currently in the process of making a temporary wooden ballast and deadwood form that will have the same curve as the actual ballast and dead wood, but will be much lighter in weight.  I will use this to force the new keel plank to the actual desired shape and keep it in place as I plank the boat.  It will be much easier to flip the boat for planking with this form in place versus the real ballast and dead wood that weights over 800 LBS..  I should have photos in about a week hopefully of the keel under the boat on the form.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 24, 2012, 11:22:55 PM
That is an interesting Idea - is that something you figured out or is this sort of thing done all tghe time?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 25, 2012, 12:14:29 AM
Not sure if I've seen it done before, on new boats they bend it right on to the floors, and I have seen some photos of the boat upside down being re-planked with the lead ballast and dead wood on.  That would be too dangerous in my shop, so I am going to try this temporary one instead.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 31, 2012, 03:53:10 PM
I was a busy little bee this weekend, as I made the temporary ballast/dead-wood form to bolt the keel plank to.  Now the keel plank is at the correct shape.  This form will stay on while I plank the boat.  Tonight I will set this assembly up under the boat for fit up, and to finish the rabbet as it blends into the stem.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df10b3127cceff6acb54bee100000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on January 31, 2012, 06:59:34 PM
Nice ... keep it coming
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Robert (Alerion Sailor) on January 31, 2012, 09:10:08 PM
Slick idea, looks like fun
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on February 01, 2012, 05:18:07 PM
Okay, I had to post this picture because I am so proud to see that new keel sitting under this boat.  This boat has looked like a piece of crap for so long with the rotted transom, stem, broken frames, and keel that was checked so bad you could see through it to the floor.  With the new frames, stem, and now keel plank I am beginning to feel like this boat is on it's way.  I stood in my garage for a good ten minutes just staring at how nice it looked, and trying to pat myself on the back.   Also this boat is supposed to be 15' 10 inches, however it was 15' 8 3/4" when I got it.  Doing some careful geometry on the dead wood, and measuring angles off of the Mystic drawings, I found the angle of the rudder post and transom knee to be off by two degrees.  I corrected this by adjusting the transom knee, and will make the appropriate change to the new rudder post.  But last night I measured from the top of my temporary transom to the tip of the stem to be 15' 10" exactly.

There is a lot of work t be done still on the keel and floor timbers to make sure that they all mate up properly.  I may even have to re-make some new floors at some frames. 

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2dc20b3127cceff1602a3731e00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on February 02, 2012, 02:53:52 AM
Erick: GREAT!  I am loving this thread.

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on March 16, 2012, 09:05:43 PM
It's been a few weeks since my last confession...  I've been spending a lot of time with my mistress in the garage. Right now I am making several floor timbers all over again because they are slightly short of meeting the keel rabbet.  Why couldn't they be slightly over-sized? Damn!!!  In a few weeks I will have some more pictures of all the finished floors installed, and will move on to the planking starting with making the new mahogany sheer strakes.
I am almost done with all of the new structural members (all new frames, all new floors, stem, transom knee, deck beams, breast hook), Whoooppeee!!!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on April 10, 2012, 03:04:30 PM
All of the structural work is done, well almost all, I am still waiting for a 12 inch carriage bolt to arrive so that I can finish installing the new breast hook.  Then I will verify that the old sheer strakes have the right curve, and I will mark the frames for the top of the sheer before I make the new sheer strakes (that should prove challenging since they have that ogee, and you have to make sure the top edge has the correct bevel for the decks).

I built a jig to align the transom so it sits level and centered at the stern, this jig will also fix the hull shape when I flip her over to plank from the garboard to the sheer.  My plan is to first replace the sheer strakes while the boat is still upright, then flip her and finish the planking.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2da31b3127cceff801da84a4400000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2da31b3127cceff803a0e8b5900000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2da31b3127cceff81f45bab2700000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Charles Barclay on April 10, 2012, 05:36:21 PM
Nice work Erick! 

Your frames all appear finished, epoxy coated, varnished?  Also, the carriage bolts you mentioned earlier being too short, the ones in the first picture look zinc plated, are they temporaries?

Nice use of electrical ties.

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on April 10, 2012, 06:07:51 PM
Thanks Charles,

The frames are painted with red lead primer that I made from a recipe a nice fellow on the Wooden Boat forum provided me.  The floors were primered and painted with two coats of white Kirby enamel paint.  All of the carriage bolts are silicone bronze except for the temporary ones in the transom knee and the ones holding the keel plank to the temporary form under the boat.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on April 23, 2012, 03:20:17 PM
The planking has begun!!! I am starting with the mahogany sheer strakes.  I made a template from the shape of the old sheer planks.  I planed the bevel on the top surface, and I began the process of making the signature Herreshoff ogee.  The test piece below shows how far i am so far on the ogee.  I just have to keep from screwing up the last little bit.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2da02b3127cceffbad4c6fa9900000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2da02b3127cceffbb3ec1daa700000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on June 11, 2012, 04:30:55 PM
Well, the sheer strakes are on, and I've begun the process of getting out the cedar planks.  Now that I've got the first one almost finished, I'm figuring about a week per plank in the beginning.  Maybe it will go faster as I get better at it.  However the Colonel gets back from duty in about two weeks, so any time gained by efficiency will be lost by the "honey do" list.

The time consuming part of the planking process is that after you spile the plank, it is a close fit, however you must take the plank off and clamp it back on several times to make adjustments.  They say 1/32" gaps are okay in spots, and I am pretty much there, but I want to be extra fussy with the fit-up of the upper planks because they probably won't swell to close up, but rather dry out and have a tendency to open up from sun exposure and lack of water immersion.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2d830b3127ccef002ba4e3a2200000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2d830b3127ccef003625d9b2100000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 27, 2012, 02:47:22 PM
Well, the boat is half planked and I am very happy with the results so far.  Greg Rossel says in his book to try to have the planks flush as much as possible, with some gaps of 1/32" being acceptable.  I checked with my feeler gauge and my largest gap is only about 1/64".  Now I have to flip the boat over (big party this weekend) and start planking from the garboard to the center where I will install a shutter plank.  I t turns out that with the shutter plank at plank #6 this plank will not have to be backed out because it lays flat against the frames it's whole length.  As a matter of fact, most of these lower planks lay flat except the garboard which has a reverse curve.  That  one should be a challenge to fit up. (new photos added at www.erickswoodenboatpics.shutterfly.com).

BTW, it may be time to have insurance on this boat, does anyone know a good insurance company for these classic wooden boats?

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2d906b3127ccef0e235883dd400000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 27, 2012, 05:58:26 PM
Nice Erick! Wish I were closer - I flip boats for beer... ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 27, 2012, 07:55:16 PM
There will be plenty of beer, and you aren't that far away.  What three hours? ;D
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on July 27, 2012, 10:04:11 PM
Erick:  Hagerty Insurance in Michigan is a good place to check.

And I wish to point out that a "shutter plank" is more appropriately termed the "whiskey plank".   ;D

That said, what was your reasoning process behind planking right-side up?  HMCo did it upside down, and the sheerstrake was actually the "whiskey plank".  That's the way we did it it the building classes I took as well.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 27, 2012, 10:41:54 PM
Hi Steve, Whiskey (or beer in my case) sounds appropriate.  There will be a celebration when that puppy goes in.

Since there was some loss of shape to my boat, I wanted to get the sheer set exactly where it was supposed to be before I started planking.  I found it better to set the sheer with the boat upright. I guess I could have planked upside down until plank #3 then set the sheer and installed Plank #2 as the Whiskey plank, but plank 2 has some backing out to it, and I thought this would make it harder to fit.

As I have it now, plank six is the whiskey plank and it lays flat against all the frames and requires no backing out.
Not sure it makes much difference, but we'll see.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 28, 2012, 03:01:12 AM
I think Waldo and Llewellyn Howlands old insurance company also does Wood boats - W. & L. Howland Insurance Agency, Inc. in New Bedford MA.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on April 08, 2013, 07:38:34 PM
Ahoy there mates!!! Finally got the garboard planks on, Yayyyyy!! Moving on to the next set.  I plan to be finished planking by June and on to making the new transom.
Next year's regatta is definitely looking doable.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3da29b3127ccef284d89891af00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130408142138541.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on April 08, 2013, 08:15:13 PM
Was thinking about you the other day Erick - wondering when we'd get the next installment of 1498's resto! looking good!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on April 09, 2013, 11:47:45 AM
Nice work, Erick!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on April 09, 2013, 10:37:05 PM
Thanks guys, this Carvel planking is really a fun process.  I wish I was independently wealthy so I could do this all day instead of working.  A few eye openers though... For example, I have a plug cutter and was planning on making my own cedar bungs.  Well, I thought it would go smoothly because I didn't have any trouble making the mahogany bungs or oak bungs with this cutter.  Well, apparently it's a different story with the soft cedar.  When I plunge the cutter down into the cedar as quickly as I would want to given that I have to make around 1300 of the little buggers, they come out ragged.  In order to make clean looking ones I have to drill very slowly, and at that pace gentlemen, I'll be done somewhere around the time our national debt becomes a surplus.  So apparently I am going to be spending close to $200 on pre-made cedar bungs.   

It's really starting to get close to being a completed hull.  I was so excited that I ordered my new sails already.  Still a lot of work to do, but I should have it flipped right side up somewhere mid summer (another boat flipping party, don't miss it this time Adam :), and attaching the ballast and dead wood. Then finishing the interior over the winter.  That's the plan anyway.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on April 09, 2013, 11:18:39 PM
I can flip with the best of 'em!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 13, 2013, 02:50:27 PM
Getting closer

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3db32b3127ccef34ec607a8b700000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130513123059074.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Charles Barclay on May 13, 2013, 06:06:24 PM
Your mistress has a lovely turn to her bilge.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 13, 2013, 10:24:57 PM
I guess if I'm posting nude photos like this it leaves me open for comments like that  ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 29, 2013, 04:04:35 PM
The whiskey plank is on the boat, ta-da !!!  Now on to the new transom.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3db08b3127ccef36eb4f6c5bb00000030O30AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130529122906959.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D3/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on May 31, 2013, 12:24:19 PM
Transom next.  Then what - flip her over for the deck beams?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 31, 2013, 02:25:57 PM
Transom, then fair hull, then caulk seams, then flip over and install ballast and dead wood, make and install new rudder post, then finish out the inside (the deck beams are already in place, but that's about all).  The flipping over party is going to be July 13th.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on June 17, 2013, 04:25:48 PM
After a bit of a struggle and a couple of re-dos, the transom is installed.  I had to raise the sheer on the port side which required added a make-up strip to the rear end of the adjacent cedar plank, then I had to plug and re-drill the plank to transom screw holes to get a better angle to close the joint tight.  But it's on now and it is symmetrical and I managed NOT to screw up that beautiful piece of mahogany.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d836b3127ccef337f87efebd00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130617122410867.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on June 17, 2013, 04:28:59 PM
You’re embarrassing me…. It just took me a week to make a single replacement hatchboard….:-(
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on June 17, 2013, 04:34:05 PM
Yeah, but you have a small child if I recall.  And BTW, my wife is letting me get all obsessive on this project because she says when I'm done she's going to own me.  Like she doesn't already, ha.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Jon Brooks on June 19, 2013, 05:42:49 PM
Wow!  Is that a single piece of Mahogany?! 

Jon  8)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on June 19, 2013, 05:49:47 PM
No, it's actually six pieces, but they are all from the same tree, and all cut quartersawn,so the straight grain seems to line up well.  I think it will look very uniform when it's varnished.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 15, 2013, 03:01:04 PM
The hull fairing is complete, and I now have muscles in my arms.  Muscles that scream for Ibuprofen.

I began the cotton caulking yesterday.  I have twenty seams to do and I worked on six yesterday.  This is an interesting process.  I basically learned how to do this from watching YouTube videos of shipwrights explaining and then demonstrating the process.  They were using cotton batting whereas I am using cotton wicking, but I figure the process has to be exactly the same.  One thing I learned that seemed to make a lot of sense is that the cotton is put in in loops that end up causing alternating areas of thick then thin caulking along the seam.  One gentleman explained that this is necessary to prevent the planks from sawing against each other when the hull is under the stresses of sailing.

The photos below show the process.  1) Twist the cotton then insert the cotton in the seam in loops (the loops can be varied as the seam gets bigger or smaller).  2) Insert the mid sections of the loops.  3) Push the cotton level with the seam.  4) Go into the kitchen and grab the pizza cutter to set the cotton about 1/16th deep into the seam.  Fri st you will need to grind off the sharp edge). Better yet, buy a new pizza cutter and dispense with the greef you'll get.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d934b3127ccef3ca54a5e37100000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130715122115165.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d934b3127ccef3cbf65742ae00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130715122149087.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d934b3127ccef3ca90dfe36900000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130715122223431.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 15, 2013, 03:40:19 PM
Question - is the cotton oiled or waxed in anyway? I remember doing this on a 30' Cuttyhunk style bass boat that a buddy of mine owned for a decade or so - I remember covering the cotton in slickseam before applying.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 15, 2013, 04:07:06 PM
Everything I've read, and the videos I've seen, the caulking goes in dry and is then painted over with primer before the oil based seam compound goes in.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 16, 2013, 08:49:12 PM
I remember oil/waxing the cotton before caulking - then doing exacly as you stated - slickseam to the seams after painting. I was taking orders so who knows if it was correct to begin with. I can tell you she was worked offshore for many years as a tuna boat and never leaked a drop.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 16, 2013, 09:07:58 PM
Well I think the cotton is the second line of defense anyway.  If your planks fit good against each other then they are going to swell up and close at the inside third of the plank where there is not supposed to be any cotton.  The cotton is in the middle of the plank seam.  I took pains when I beveled and fit the planks that I did not have gaps that would allow me to push the cotton beyond the inside edge of the planks.  I am also making sure I don't pound the cotton in and risk doing the same.  The pizza roller is working out nicely so far.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on July 17, 2013, 12:14:24 PM
Did you rule out using caulking irons and a caulking mallet?  Also, why not oakum?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 17, 2013, 03:48:00 PM
The seams on the 12 /12 are pretty small.  I purchased the smallest caulking iron, and it's too wide for some of the spots in my seams, so I am just using a stiff thin putty knife.  It works great.  Oakum also tends to be used on larger seams and on older boats that may require more help from the caulking. With relatively thin cedar planks like the 12 1/2 has (7/16") I have been told by the experts that you have to be careful that you don't go pounding the caulking in like you see people do on larger boats with the big mallet and all.  It would be very easy to blast the caulking right through the hull.  Several people have suggested the pizza slicer rolling in method for small seams like this and it's working out great.  I took a light under the hull last night and I can't see any cotton from the inside, which was a relief because it felt like it pushed in a bit far in a few places.

I still have half the boat to caulk, but now I'm trying to figure out how I am going to mark the waterline on both sides in my tight shop.  I'm thinking of using a rotating laser level, but I have two support columns on one side of the boat and am only two feet away from the wall on the other side.  I think I can set the laser up on the column side and get it to work, but I'll probably have to turn the boat around to do the other side.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 22, 2013, 08:17:29 PM
Finished caulking, finished putting primer down.  Next paying the seams

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d903b3127ccef3f92e7dd07500000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130722124041352.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d903b3127ccef3f8a7e8314000000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130722124144213.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d903b3127ccef3f878a371fc00000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130722124319639.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 24, 2013, 03:03:02 PM
Luke, I am your father.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d905b3127ccef3e423bce3d900000010O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130724122257725.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on October 15, 2013, 08:34:04 PM
I've flipped the boat and installed the sheer clamps, installed the chain plates, adjusted the sheer, finalized the deck beams, prepared the ballast, and am currently installing the ballast.  And I'm still married.

Final check of the sheer line...

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d736b3127ccef47619f1281200000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130917124852981.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

Filling the checks in the dead wood...

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3d711b3127ccef4683099f27300000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420130930122959159.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

Irish felt between the keel and ballast...

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3ce35b3127ccef40962180b5200000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420131014121335762.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

Bald guy tightening the keel bolts...

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3ce35b3127ccef4082866aa7500000030O10AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420131014121451944.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D1/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/).

Fit-up prior to tightening...

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3ce35b3127ccef409ec208a1d00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420131014121230216.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on October 16, 2013, 01:37:49 PM
REALLY nice work, Erick
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on October 18, 2013, 02:28:04 AM
Next summers regatta? You gona make it....
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on October 18, 2013, 08:14:37 PM
Barring something outlandish, I am shooting for a June launching
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on October 21, 2013, 06:16:40 PM
I volunteer for beer duty...Errr crew duty..... ;)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on October 21, 2013, 07:14:41 PM
I'm trying to train the wife to crew for the museum regatta race, but I may need a crew for the Wind Hill the following day.  Not sure She'd be up for a race that takes 4+ hours.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on January 02, 2014, 06:41:19 PM
Well, it's been a while since my last post.  I've been working on painting the inside of the hull and have started on the rear deck beams and bulkheads.  I'll tell ya, working on the inside with the hull completed really makes me feel like I'm getting close to the end.  I still have a lot of work to get done by my expected June or July launch date, but I am pretty sure I can make it.  Here are some photos from the fall up to now.  I made the stupid mistake of using this dark grey primer, which took way too many coats of white to cover on the inside of the hull, five in all.  I think I'm going to sand it back and apply a white primer before I paint the outer hull white.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3cc32b3127ccef48e3911f99300000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420131213152124810.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a3cc32b3127ccef48f923c993f00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420131213152241390.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4df23b3127ccef55142349bcd00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140102133335471.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4df23b3127ccef550158bfb8d00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140102133752883.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on January 04, 2014, 11:09:09 PM
Amazing work Erick!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on February 26, 2014, 08:42:43 PM
The latest Progress...   I've been working in the cockpit.  I had to make new seats which disappoints me because I wanted to keep as much of the original boat as I could , but upon further inspection, the old seats were split so bad that they could not be re-used.  I guess I could have epoxied them to death, but it would have been an ugly repair.  They were also just under 3/4" thickness, when the plans call for them to be 1.0 inches thick, so I made new ones out of the specified Philippine mahogany.

The cockpit decking has bee a fun bit of work.  I managed to get the hatches to fit really nice so they pop in and out easily, but do not wiggle around.  Here I used clear vertical grain Douglas fir instead of the cedar called out in the plans because it is a bit harder and will resist scratching a little more.  I plan to give the decking an oi finish for ease of maintenance, the same with the seats.  I am currently working on the ceiling pieces that protect the planking under the seats, I wasn't planning on using the old ones, but in this case I can fill the old screw holes a epoxy some of the wear spots and they should look like new.

It's been damned cold here, and the Colonel is getting mad at me for using the electric heat in the garage so much, but I've had to do some more painting in the cockpit so I could install the decking and seats permanently.  Have to keep to the schedule you know!!!

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4dc26b3127ccef51b0b23745600000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140207183158898.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4dc04b3127ccef5262ec8353a00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140225141823822.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4dc04b3127ccef526690af47300000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140225141855238.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on February 26, 2014, 09:20:55 PM
Did you ever re-prime the hull white?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on February 26, 2014, 09:45:22 PM
No Adam, not yet.  I plan to sand it back some in the spring and prime it white with Kirby primer, and then top coat with the Kirby white.  I'm going to try to spray it with a new sprayer I bought.  The bulkhead in the above photo was primed with Kirby and painted with three coats of Kirby white topside paint.  The three coats of Kirby are more opaque than the five coats of the other crap I was using, but I still want to put another coat on eventually because I can just barely see through in some spots, and in the full sunlight it may show more.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on February 27, 2014, 01:52:42 PM
She looks really nice, Erick
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on February 27, 2014, 03:18:07 PM
Thanks Steve, still a lot to do yet, and this cold weather isn't helping things.  I still hope to launch in June sometime.  I have reserved a month to make and install the new coamings. Maybe I'll get lucky and they won't take that long.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on February 28, 2014, 05:26:31 PM
Erick - what are you doing about sail's? I seem to forget - is she gaff or Marconi?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on February 28, 2014, 06:02:56 PM
I had a brand new suit of sails made last year by Sperry Sails, main, jib and spinnaker so I wouldn't have to worry about getting them finished in time this year.  She is a marconi rigged boat.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on May 27, 2014, 09:27:48 PM
Hey guys, I'm starting to get excited, it's getting closer and closer every day.  Only about five more weeks of work.  I even went so far as lining up my guy to make the cockpit covers and sail covers for the last week in June.

Here are some photos of the latest work:

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4db02b3127ccef67be626d28f00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140523132142569.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4db06b3127ccef66236ae90f500000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140527122821679.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4db06b3127ccef6639ca9b0eb00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140527122659629.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4db06b3127ccef6639257312200000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140527122622603.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4db06b3127ccef6621a7f110200000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140527122826332.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on May 28, 2014, 01:20:41 PM
A far cry from what you started with.  Outstanding!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Charles Barclay on May 29, 2014, 05:02:33 AM
Great job!

Make sure Steve gets a nice new 'after' picture to update the database with. 

Wonderful transformation. 
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on May 29, 2014, 04:56:20 PM
Unbelievable Job Erick!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 07, 2014, 02:42:14 PM
Alemana finally comes out of the garage to let the mahogany get a little sun tan.  You can imagine how excited I am right now.  The decks are actually more tan then they are showing in these pictures, the sun is washing it out quite a bit.  I am sending her to get a cockpit cover made, while I work on the mast, then when I get her back it's just some final touches.  August 1st is still the launch date in Bristol R.I.  Woooo Hooooo, it's getting close !!! Now I have to learn how to tie some knots, ha.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d926b3127ccef6dac04b98d700000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140707122428789.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d926b3127ccef6db93b8f8d900000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140707122730692.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d926b3127ccef6da8d3bd81900000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140707122753008.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d926b3127ccef6db2812398600000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140707122722610.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: DaveHub on July 08, 2014, 02:48:09 PM
Wow!  Great to see another one saved, and in the 100th anniversary year to boot!

I'm in the same boat (er, situation) with mine.  Have to learn to sail a quite different boat than anything I have before.

But that's one of the (several) reasons I did it anyway, to exercise the little gray cells and learn new things.

Enjoy!

Dave
 
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 28, 2014, 04:00:40 PM
The last few days before launch this Friday.  Rigged her up yesterday in between lightning storms.  Taking tomorrow off to hopefully get caught up.  So many things to do in the last few days.

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d909b3127ccef6ed87ef269a00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140728135314610.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Adam on July 29, 2014, 04:22:57 PM
Wow - what a job Erick. Congrates.... Question I noticed you built a small mast section (white). What was the purpose - just to see how things "fit"?
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 29, 2014, 06:07:41 PM
thanks Adam.  the little mast was the bottom section that I cut off because it was cracking at the mast partner.  I used it to have the boom up so the canvas maker could make a boom tent (cockpit cover) for me.

I just installed the bilge pump this morning.  Still a laundry list of stuff to do.
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on July 30, 2014, 03:58:32 AM
Erick:  I am IMPRESSED!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on July 30, 2014, 05:08:04 AM
Thanks Steve,

Still working like crazy to get things finalized.  Found out the sailmaker put all these fancy new fangled features in the sails, like a jack line in the jib, and leech adjusters in both the main and jib.  Have to figure all this stuff out.

I'll post some pictures of her sailing soon.

Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Charles Barclay on July 30, 2014, 08:48:55 AM
Erick,

Full jib boom or three quarter?

Gaff or marconi?

Reef points?

Cunningham?

Tracks or lacing, loose footed main with shelf?

Can we keep peppering you with questions?

Well done, sir!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Erick Singleman on August 05, 2014, 07:57:05 PM
Well, this post should end my contribution to this thread as the restoration is finally complete.  Many thanks to all for the encouragement and support.
ALEMANA has launched and is moored next to a few of her siblings.  We sailed her on Sunday under very light 5 to 8 knot winds and she moved along well.  I still have to make some minor adjustments to the rigging, put some tell-tails on, and finish some minor details, but she is ready to go.

I am now at my wife's disposal for other projects around the house.  Please pray for me!!!

Some photos:

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d624b3127ccef69e769bee7300000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140805174216245.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d624b3127ccef69f94bd4f5800000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140805174229409.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d624b3127ccef69ea5132f3a00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140805174304661.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)

(http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a4d624b3127ccef69ef2806f1a00000030O00AaMm7Jm0ct2QPbz4E/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00207943272420140805174110037.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/)
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Steve on August 05, 2014, 10:29:42 PM
You should be very proud of yourself.  Great job!
Title: Re: Hull #1498 Restoration
Post by: Behrends on August 22, 2017, 10:32:50 AM
The restoration looks great! Congrats!